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WPA: Cooler Bodies by Diana Lynn Small

WPA: Cooler Bodies by Diana Lynn Small

Salvage Vanguard Theater (SVT) announces Works Progress Austin: Cooler Bodies, featuring a reading of new work by Diana Lynn Small. Are people born special or does creativity evolve from our sufferings? Rhonda and Glend, the two most creatively powerful people in the world move to a mystical 1950s suburb in the desert to ruffle the feathers of their boring teenage-neighbor, Mary, to see if trauma will turn Mary into a brilliant human being. It's getting hot, the air conditioners are breaking down and everybody wants to take a dip in Mary's shiny, clean swimming pool. Works Progress Austin, SVT’s script development series, launched in 2006. WPA provides playwrights with the resources they need to bring their work to life: actors, stage managers, rehearsal time + space, cash, and the chance to share their work with an audience in the earliest stages of creation. PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE: July 28th at 8pm PERFORMANCE LOCATION: grayDUCK Gallery/ 2213 E Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX 78702 TICKETS: FREE online or at the door. Reservations can be made at salvagevanguard.org/tickets/

The gallery will be closed this weekend while we get ready for the Crit Group show. But we are hosting two fun events in the mean time Salvage Vanguard Theater : Cooler Bodies by Diana Lynn Small & fields : Big Fun.

fields

We're excited to feature Tara Bhattacharya Reed performing a solo set at our fundraiser event on Saturday, July 29. Tara is the curator at Antumbrae Intermedia Events + Installations, and she is helping to turn Austin into a hub for experimental music and sound art. Read our interview with her from our latest issue and learn about Tara's amazing work, then see her perform in person this Saturday at grayDUCK Gallery.

MAEP Opening: Joe Sinness

MAEP Opening: Joe Sinness

Join us for the opening of the next Minnesota Artist Exhibition Program exhibition: "Joe Sinness: the Flowers." Juxtaposing portraits, still-lifes, theatrical sculptures, and cinematic panoramas, Sinness’ works display the performance of sexual desire. Drawing inspiration from vintage physique magazines and iconic films like Cruising, starring Al Pacino, Sinness visualizes desire and pursues a vision of utopic queer spaces and characters—portraying his subjects as tender and worthy of desire. This exhibition is part of the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program, now located in U.S. Bank Gallery. Generous support for MAEP provided by McKnight Foundation. Additional support provided by RBC Wealth Management. Artist Talk: Thursday, September 21, 7PM

If you are in Minneapolis definitely go to this show! Congrats Joe Sinness! https://www.facebook.com/events/319669885157703/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2229%22%2C%22ref_notif_type%22%3A%22plan_user_invited%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&notif_t=plan_user_invited&notif_id=1499999724086116

Artist Talk with Cade Bradshaw

Artist Talk with Cade Bradshaw

“Eye’s Got It!” is an annual visual art competition created by Jamie Salvador Castillo that brings together a professional panel of judges and artists from all over Central Texas. Artist’s submissions are whittled down through three rounds of increasingly tougher critique and discussions. The grand prize is a solo show at grayDUCK gallery. We are excited to present this year’s winner, San Antonio artist, Cade Bradshaw who won over the judges with his meticulous sculptures and his insight into the natural world. Cade Bradshaw Formally trained in biology, my work uses a scientific process to explore the complexity of our world. I make observations about our environments and lives, then devise quantitative and qualitative studies. Through this analysis, I make objects exploring the nature of our realities. Of specific concern are our foundations for knowledge, and perceptions of time and space. Biological and chemical changes happen on vast and varied scales. Trees can grow a foot or more per year, and may live to be several thousands years old. Similarly, molecules quickly assemble and disassemble to create mechanically complex chains. Both forms of growth rival the most advanced creations of mankind, yet have evolved from the deceptively simple process of repeated success and failure. The human life span is a slim frame of reference when compared to the vastness of our universe. Our senses amass multitudes of data, and mingle with imagination and memory to produce our version of the world. Consciousness fluctuates as it attempts to reconcile this onslaught of sensory inputs. These “objective” inputs are muddled as we begin to form memories. As time passes, we are left to unravel what is remembered, and what is imagined. Little Worlds, covers a broad expanse of time and the notion of objective reality.

“Eye’s Got It!” is an annual visual art competition created by Jamie Salvador Castillo that brings together a professional panel of judges and artists from all over Central Texas. Artist’s submissions are whittled down through three rounds of increasingly tougher critique and discussions. The grand prize is a solo show at grayDUCK gallery. We are excited to present this year’s winner, San Antonio artist, Cade Bradshaw who won over the judges with his meticulous sculptures and his insight into the natural world. Cade Bradshaw Formally trained in biology, my work uses a scientific process to explore the complexity of our world. I make observations about our environments and lives, then devise quantitative and qualitative studies. Through this analysis, I make objects exploring the nature of our realities. Of specific concern are our foundations for knowledge, and perceptions of time and space. Biological and chemical changes happen on vast and varied scales. Trees can grow a foot or more per year, and may live to be several thousands years old. Similarly, molecules quickly assemble and disassemble to create mechanically complex chains. Both forms of growth rival the most advanced creations of mankind, yet have evolved from the deceptively simple process of repeated success and failure. The human life span is a slim frame of reference when compared to the vastness of our universe. Our senses amass multitudes of data, and mingle with imagination and memory to produce our version of the world. Consciousness fluctuates as it attempts to reconcile this onslaught of sensory inputs. These “objective” inputs are muddled as we begin to form memories. As time passes, we are left to unravel what is remembered, and what is imagined. Little Worlds, covers a broad expanse of time and the notion of objective reality.

This is the last weekend to see the Collectors Show. Stop on by and see all the great work in this exhibition. Thank you Ann Berman, Shawn Smith, Anastasia Colombo, Jay Colombo, Shalini Ramanathan, Chris Tomlinson, Elisa Sumner, Joel Sumner, Mike Chesser & Don Mullins for all your hard work!

Shalini Ramanathan & Chris Tomlinson - participating collectors in the Collector Show. Shalini and Chris have lived and worked all over the world. Chris is a writer and reporter, and Shalini develops huge wind energy projects. Their collection reflects the places they have called home. “We’ve been lucky to live abroad and travel the world. We know that talent/creativity/insight aren’t owned by any one group of people. We’re interested in supporting voices that aren’t always heard.” Their house is filled with art that commemorates important moments in their lives and celebrates the friends that surround them. “We buy what we love, and we don’t pay too much attention to the crazy money aspect of the art world. We believe that a community is defined as much by its artists as by its geography or its festivals, and that we need artists to help us understand ourselves and our world. If you want a vibrant community, consider supporting local artists.”

Elisa Sumner & Joel Sumner - participating collectors in the Collectors Show. Elisa and Joel keep an exhaustive social calendar supporting local art. Simply put, they see everything. “We are both employed in high-tech and we wish there were more techies who were collecting Austin art. That’s been our white whale - to find more of us.” They began their collecting in 2003, visiting studios during EAST. “Each year the artists we saw the previous year generously gave their recommendations of new people to see. The wonderful thing about the Austin arts community is that everyone is so eager to share what they think is cool or interesting.” Joel and Elisa have a distinctive collection, and they don’t shy away from difficult subject matter or unusual materials in fact they are drawn to it.

Little Worlds - Cade Bradshaw

Little Worlds - Cade Bradshaw

Opening Reception: Friday, June 23, 7-10pm Exhibition Dates: June 23 – July 23, 2017 Artist Talk: Sunday, June 25, 2pm “Eye’s Got It!” is an annual visual art competition created by Jamie Salvador Castillo that brings together a professional panel of judges and artists from all over Central Texas. Artist’s submissions are whittled down through three rounds of increasingly tougher critique and discussions. The grand prize is a solo show at grayDUCK gallery. We are excited to present this year’s winner, San Antonio artist, Cade Bradshaw who won over the judges with his meticulous sculptures and his insight into the natural world. Cade Bradshaw Formally trained in biology, my work uses a scientific process to explore the complexity of our world. I make observations about our environments and lives, then devise quantitative and qualitative studies. Through this analysis, I make objects exploring the nature of our realities. Of specific concern are our foundations for knowledge, and perceptions of time and space. Biological and chemical changes happen on vast and varied scales. Trees can grow a foot or more per year, and may live to be several thousands years old. Similarly, molecules quickly assemble and disassemble to create mechanically complex chains. Both forms of growth rival the most advanced creations of mankind, yet have evolved from the deceptively simple process of repeated success and failure. The human life span is a slim frame of reference when compared to the vastness of our universe. Our senses amass multitudes of data, and mingle with imagination and memory to produce our version of the world. Consciousness fluctuates as it attempts to reconcile this onslaught of sensory inputs. These “objective” inputs are muddled as we begin to form memories. As time passes, we are left to unravel what is remembered, and what is imagined. Little Worlds, covers a broad expanse of time and the notion of objective reality.

Opening Reception: Friday, June 23, 7-10pm Exhibition Dates: June 23 – July 23, 2017 Artist Talk: Sunday, June 25, 2pm “Eye’s Got It!” is an annual visual art competition created by Jamie Salvador Castillo that brings together a professional panel of judges and artists from all over Central Texas. Artist’s submissions are whittled down through three rounds of increasingly tougher critique and discussions. The grand prize is a solo show at grayDUCK gallery. We are excited to present this year’s winner, San Antonio artist, Cade Bradshaw who won over the judges with his meticulous sculptures and his insight into the natural world. Cade Bradshaw Formally trained in biology, my work uses a scientific process to explore the complexity of our world. I make observations about our environments and lives, then devise quantitative and qualitative studies. Through this analysis, I make objects exploring the nature of our realities. Of specific concern are our foundations for knowledge, and perceptions of time and space. Biological and chemical changes happen on vast and varied scales. Trees can grow a foot or more per year, and may live to be several thousands years old. Similarly, molecules quickly assemble and disassemble to create mechanically complex chains. Both forms of growth rival the most advanced creations of mankind, yet have evolved from the deceptively simple process of repeated success and failure. The human life span is a slim frame of reference when compared to the vastness of our universe. Our senses amass multitudes of data, and mingle with imagination and memory to produce our version of the world. Consciousness fluctuates as it attempts to reconcile this onslaught of sensory inputs. These “objective” inputs are muddled as we begin to form memories. As time passes, we are left to unravel what is remembered, and what is imagined. Little Worlds, covers a broad expanse of time and the notion of objective reality.

Donald Mullins - participation collector in the Collectors Show. Don started collecting art in his hometown, Houston, in the early 1990s. After moving to Austin, he became attracted to the lively art scene surrounding the Creative Research Laboratory at Flatbed Press (now the Visual Arts Center at UT). CRL was a venue that provided emerging artists a first exhibition space and seasoned artists a home base. While creating dialogues across communities, they collaborated with other art groups and galleries such as the Fresh Up Club. Don developed many deep friendships at those art shows that have lasted until today. “Lots of people see the art world as inaccessible or elitist. That may be the case in certain circles, but I have always found artists to be the easiest and most interesting entry point. I make friends and ask lots of questions. The fact that you are interested in their work means you have a connection.“

Ann Berman & Shawn Smith - participating collectors in the Collectors Show Ann, who has a dancer/choreographer background and is currently working as a finance director, has the same left brain-right brain dynamic as her internationally exhibiting artist and science geek husband, Shawn. Their collection, which has been put together with quirky love and humor, had a wonderful beginning. “We were first inspired to start collecting back in Dallas in 1995 when we met well-known collectors, Sonny Burt and Bob Butler. They were interested in buying one of Shawn’s sculptures and invited us to tour their home which was custom built to house their extensive art collection. They collected what they loved, not what was necessarily fashionable or a wise investment opportunity. We were deeply inspired and we became life-long friends. When we got engaged in 2001, rather than registering for china and silverware, we asked people to consider donating to our future art collection. Since then, we have followed in Sonny and Bob’s footsteps and purchased pieces that tickled us and made us happy. The first piece we purchased with our wedding fund was Semper Cute by Kathy Aoki. We were immediately drawn to its ambiguity, quirkiness, and humor. Like Sonny and Bob, we purchase things we love.”

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