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The Twilight Worlds of Kate McCabe

The Twilight Worlds of Kate McCabe

Romance, Apocalypse and Moon Landings: The Twilight Worlds of Kate McCabe Kate McCabe in Person! Kate McCabe will be showcasing a decade’s worth of her moving image work combining humor in experimental film and premiering her latest 16mm work, You and I Remain. A film inspired by the Anthropocene, You and I Remain is an apocalyptic lullaby, a landscape film mediating on the end of the world. Shot in Big Sur, the Salton Sea and in McCabe’s own neighborhood of Joshua Tree, the film shows us a portrait of the world askew with subtle and moving sound design by Jason Payne of Nitzer Ebb. Kate McCabe (American b. 1972) lives in the desert near the rock-n-roll heaven known as Joshua Tree, California where she founded the art collective Kidnap Yourself. In Philadelphia, her youth was dominated by dance and art where she allegedly danced out of the womb. She is a graduate of Girls’ High, the University of the Arts and she obtained her MFA in Experimental Animation from the California Institute of the Arts under the innovative Jules Engel. She is an award winning independent filmmaker who has shown films globally since 1995 in both film festivals and galleries and the occasional guerrilla drive-in. She is most re-known internationally for Sabbia, her first feature film, a visual album for stoner rock prince, Brant Bjork. Her current work includes paintings, photography, short fiction, and art books. Her popular sketch comic book “Mojave Weather Diaries” has produced 4 books in the series and counting. McCabe has taught film at CalArts and UC San Diego and has worked with some of Los Angeles’ most prolific independent filmmakers including Eli Roth and Pat O’Neill. “Kate McCabe’s works are funny and sweet personal observations of our twilight worlds. Worlds where portraits of places and emotions are the kinetic sublime- where we as viewers are transported betwixt and between, hovering – our feet grounded on earth, our heads in the clouds. The everyday scene, a moving lyrical event functioning as a tribute to beauty and our lucid spirit. These short films are like private conversations sharing a secret and a dream.” PROGRAM: Milk and Honey 16mm color, sound, 15mins, 2004 Darling 16mm on video, color, sound 4 mins, 2011 Sabbia 16mm on video, color, sound, excerpt 15 min of 80, 2006 My Sweet 16mm on video, color, sound, 4 mins, 2013 Song for Pickles Super8 on video, B&W, sound, 3 mins. 2013 You and I Remain 16mm, color, sound, 15mins, 2015 My Friend 16mm on video, color, sound, 7 mins., 2015 Portraits 16mm, color sound, 8 min, 2001 There Are No Shadows in East Berlin digital video, color sound, 10 mins 2017 Total running time 82 minutes More info: http://www.ercatx.org/romance-apocalypse-and-moon-landings-the-twilight-worlds-of-kate-mccabe/ Suggested donation $7 general / $5 students

Hollis Hammonds, Jenn Hassin & Claude van Lingen

Hollis Hammonds, Jenn Hassin & Claude van Lingen

What a Bloody Mess Opening Reception: Friday, April 14, 7-10pm Exhibition Dates: April 7 – May 7, 2017 Fear is a common theme with this exhibition; each artist is fretting over the future. The list of concerns is growing daily: environmental hazards, natural and man-made disasters, military conflicts, political and social strife. Influenced by media and the collective consciousness, the work reflects and calls into question the zeitgeist of our time. While each artist has an individual approach to expressing their concerns and fears about the current environmental, socio-political situation, all of the pieces reflect on and interrogate the world in which we live. Hollis Hammonds Concerned with social issues ranging from global warming to consumerist culture, natural disasters and wartime imagery, my works are filled with a variety of images, from mundane objects to precious artifacts, assembled, collected and collaged together through drawings and installations. The works themselves act as evidence, whether that is evidence of personal memories or broader events affecting larger communities. No matter what form the work takes, there are threads of memory intertwined with a sort of collective consciousness. My goal when combining a variety of images or junk picked up on street corners, is to create some scene that feels real to me, something that conjures and feels as close to my own memories as possible. Jenn Hassin My work is a labor of love and an obsession to record and reflect our troubling times. Research and facts influence my use of materials. I often use newspaper to act as a time capsule of current issues. Whether they be issues of race, our justice system, death, our military, or suicide and mental illness, our media has a way of eloquently putting these topics on paper. I also use handmade paper from clothing. Military uniforms, prison uniforms, everyday clothing, clothing worn while being raped or while working in a surgery unit, are all transformed into soft paper that I rip up and roll into tightly spiraled objects. This spiral represents an individual life, from beginning to end. Sometimes I use statistics to discuss facts behind these issues, using a one rolled piece of paper for each life represented, giving the paper a voice. This process turns into layered conceptual pieces, through which I have every intention of making a difference and promoting change. Claude van Lingen Prospective time has been the central concept driving my work since 1978. The 1000 Years From Now series reflects my deep concern for the environmental, political and social wellbeing of the world in which we live. This concept has been explored by writing dates, lists of names, figurative and nonfigurative painting and/or photographs combined with TV sets and mirrors as well as performances. They consider the layering of the physical, conscious, and subconscious experiences we have as individuals and as a global collective. In other words, this layering encapsulates the events, emotions, and conditions that link the past, the ever-changing present, and the unknown/anticipated future into an inextricable whole. Each work is created by using a medium and process most appropriate to communicating the situation to be portrayed. At times this entails the use of charcoal, flame, water and debris collected from a particular disaster site.

The gallery is back open with our new show "What a Bloody Mess" featuring Hollis Hammonds, Jenn Hassin & Claude Van Lingen. The opening reception will be a week from today, Friday, April 14. https://www.facebook.com/events/286220315116639/

Tonight is the preview / VIP party for the Art Alliance Austin's Art City Fair. Come on by and check out all the great Texas galleries. One of the featured artists at our booth: Libby Barbee - "Incidental Interference"

Hollis Hammonds, Jenn Hassin & Claude Van Lingen

Hollis Hammonds, Jenn Hassin & Claude Van Lingen

What a Bloody Mess Opening Reception: Friday, April 14, 7-10pm Exhibition Dates: April 7 – May 7, 2017 Fear is a common theme with this exhibition; each artist is fretting over the future. The list of concerns is growing daily: environmental hazards, natural and man-made disasters, military conflicts, political and social strife. Influenced by media and the collective consciousness, the work reflects and calls into question the zeitgeist of our time. While each artist has an individual approach to expressing their concerns and fears about the current environmental, socio-political situation, all of the pieces reflect on and interrogate the world in which we live. Hollis Hammonds Concerned with social issues ranging from global warming to consumerist culture, natural disasters and wartime imagery, my works are filled with a variety of images, from mundane objects to precious artifacts, assembled, collected and collaged together through drawings and installations. The works themselves act as evidence, whether that is evidence of personal memories or broader events affecting larger communities. No matter what form the work takes, there are threads of memory intertwined with a sort of collective consciousness. My goal when combining a variety of images or junk picked up on street corners, is to create some scene that feels real to me, something that conjures and feels as close to my own memories as possible. Jenn Hassin My work is a labor of love and an obsession to record and reflect our troubling times. Research and facts influence my use of materials. I often use newspaper to act as a time capsule of current issues. Whether they be issues of race, our justice system, death, our military, or suicide and mental illness, our media has a way of eloquently putting these topics on paper. I also use handmade paper from clothing. Military uniforms, prison uniforms, everyday clothing, clothing worn while being raped or while working in a surgery unit, are all transformed into soft paper that I rip up and roll into tightly spiraled objects. This spiral represents an individual life, from beginning to end. Sometimes I use statistics to discuss facts behind these issues, using a one rolled piece of paper for each life represented, giving the paper a voice. This process turns into layered conceptual pieces, through which I have every intention of making a difference and promoting change. Claude Van Lingen Prospective time has been the central concept driving my work since 1978. The 1000 Years From Now series reflects my deep concern for the environmental, political and social wellbeing of the world in which we live. This concept has been explored by writing dates, lists of names, figurative and nonfigurative painting and/or photographs combined with TV sets and mirrors as well as performances. They consider the layering of the physical, conscious, and subconscious experiences we have as individuals and as a global collective. In other words, this layering encapsulates the events, emotions, and conditions that link the past, the ever-changing present, and the unknown/anticipated future into an inextricable whole. Each work is created by using a medium and process most appropriate to communicating the situation to be portrayed. At times this entails the use of charcoal, flame, water and debris collected from a particular disaster site.

What a Bloody Mess Opening Reception: Friday, April 14, 7-10pm Exhibition Dates: April 7 – May 7, 2017 Fear is a common theme with this exhibition; each artist is fretting over the future. The list of concerns is growing daily: environmental hazards, natural and man-made disasters, military conflicts, political and social strife. Influenced by media and the collective consciousness, the work reflects and calls into question the zeitgeist of our time. While each artist has an individual approach to expressing their concerns and fears about the current environmental, socio-political situation, all of the pieces reflect on and interrogate the world in which we live. Hollis Hammonds Concerned with social issues ranging from global warming to consumerist culture, natural disasters and wartime imagery, my works are filled with a variety of images, from mundane objects to precious artifacts, assembled, collected and collaged together through drawings and installations. The works themselves act as evidence, whether that is evidence of personal memories or broader events affecting larger communities. No matter what form the work takes, there are threads of memory intertwined with a sort of collective consciousness. My goal when combining a variety of images or junk picked up on street corners, is to create some scene that feels real to me, something that conjures and feels as close to my own memories as possible. Jenn Hassin My work is a labor of love and an obsession to record and reflect our troubling times. Research and facts influence my use of materials. I often use newspaper to act as a time capsule of current issues. Whether they be issues of race, our justice system, death, our military, or suicide and mental illness, our media has a way of eloquently putting these topics on paper. I also use handmade paper from clothing. Military uniforms, prison uniforms, everyday clothing, clothing worn while being raped or while working in a surgery unit, are all transformed into soft paper that I rip up and roll into tightly spiraled objects. This spiral represents an individual life, from beginning to end. Sometimes I use statistics to discuss facts behind these issues, using a one rolled piece of paper for each life represented, giving the paper a voice. This process turns into layered conceptual pieces, through which I have every intention of making a difference and promoting change. Claude Van Lingen Prospective time has been the central concept driving my work since 1978. The 1000 Years From Now series reflects my deep concern for the environmental, political and social wellbeing of the world in which we live. This concept has been explored by writing dates, lists of names, figurative and nonfigurative painting and/or photographs combined with TV sets and mirrors as well as performances. They consider the layering of the physical, conscious, and subconscious experiences we have as individuals and as a global collective. In other words, this layering encapsulates the events, emotions, and conditions that link the past, the ever-changing present, and the unknown/anticipated future into an inextricable whole. Each work is created by using a medium and process most appropriate to communicating the situation to be portrayed. At times this entails the use of charcoal, flame, water and debris collected from a particular disaster site.

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